Plastic Waste: What We Can Do To Save The Planet (Now That China No Longer Imports Our Trash)

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by Arkain2K, May 29, 2018.

  1. Hit-N-Run

    Hit-N-Run Brown Belt

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    Good! We should also ban stupid fucking plastic toys that come with fast food. Kid plays with it for about 5 minutes and tosses it. Humans are so stupid sometimes...
     
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  2. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    I was gonna give this post a Like, but then you went stupid at the end, as if you have absolutely no idea where everyone else, including American posters, stand on the issue of plastic waste.

    You did read the thread first, right?
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
  3. KBE6EKCTAH_CCP

    KBE6EKCTAH_CCP Arrow sash belt with Lederhosen

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    No i did not, nor do i want your like. Piss off.
     
  4. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    India also been using their plastic wastes to build thei roads YEARS ago.

    It seems that idea is finally being put to the test in the West now that the recent Chinese ban forced everyone else to deal with their own plastic wastes:


    Rubbish is being transformed into roads in Melbourne
    By Danny Tran and Damian McIver

    [​IMG]

    On the face of things, plastic bags really seem to have no other benefit than carrying your shopping.

    They're bad for landfill, animals and the environment.

    But a new project in Melbourne's north has successfully been able to take the dreaded plastic bag and turn it into something that can be used again and again — a road.

    The 300-metre stretch of road, on Rayfield Avenue in Craigieburn, uses an additive that's made up of 530,000 plastic bags, more than 12,000 recycled printer cartridges and 168,000 glass bottles.

    "We think it's a great initiative," said Geoff Porter, the mayor of Hume City Council, which takes in Craigieburn.

    [​IMG]

    Tests also reveal the new road can handle extreme temperatures better and when it comes to costs, is about the same price as traditional road laying.

    It's the first time the additive's ever been used and the results have stunned the recycling company behind it, Close the Loop.

    "The great thing about it is not only is it competitive, but it is a more flexible road surface, it's more durable, it's longer lasting and it's a great use of product that would otherwise go to landfill," said Craig Devlin, the company's chairman.

    http://amp.abc.net.au/article/9812450
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
    no fat chicks and Anung Un Rama like this.
  5. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    Britain is also putting the idea of plastic roads to the test, albeit at a conservative rate: plastic only make up half a percent of the asphalt mix for now:

    Plastic bottles and bags recycled to build U.K roads
    By James Matthews, Scotland Correspondent | October 28, 2017​

    [​IMG]

    Plastic bottles and bags are being recycled into asphalt mixture to produce roads that are kinder to the environment and, manufacturers claim, longer lasting.

    A number of councils around the UK are testing the 'plastic roads'.

    The process involves making plastic pellets from bottles and bags that would otherwise be destined for landfill sites. The pellets are then melted into the asphalt mix to act as a binding agent.

    Plastic makes up roughly 0.5% of the mixture.

    Toby McCartney, of MacRebur Plastics Road Company, told Sky News: "We're able to take the waste plastics that are destined for landfill, we take those plastics and we add them into an asphalt mix to create a stronger, longer lasting road.

    [​IMG]
    The pellets are made from landfill plastic which then go into an asphalt mix​

    "It makes the end performance of the road much greater and we replace part of the bitumen in the mix, that's the fossil fuel.

    "Our analogy is that traditional bitumen is a bit like a Pritt Stick - what we have is a superglue. It binds the stuff together to form a stronger and longer lasting bind, so we have less flaking of anything coming off.

    "There's less maintenance needed for those roads and we're saving (councils) money by using up local waste for local roads."

    Three councils: Dumfries and Galloway, Cumbria, and Enfield are testing the 'plastic roads'. They stand to make financial savings.

    Councillor Elaine Murray, leader of Dumfries and Galloway Council, told Sky News: "There would be (less) landfill tax because we're not sending plastic into landfill.

    "Although, at the moment, the pellets are slightly more expensive than bitumen, bitumen depends on the oil price so that wouldn't necessarily always be the case. Also, it uses a lot less binder, so there's a saving there."

    "It's really quite exciting. Instead of using bitumen, which is a product of the oil industry, it uses plastics which would normally just go into landfill.

    "So it's environmentally friendly as well as being a good, hard surface for the road.

    "Hopefully it will be more hard-working in the longer term and save councils money."

    As much as the idea sounds like a winner in theory, in practice time will tell.

    Sky News gauged the view of Dr Karl Williams, director of the Centre for Waste and Resource Management at the University of Central Lancashire.

    He said: "I think it's too early to say how environmentally friendly these roads are because they are only going on trial roads at the moment, and in terms of what plastics they are using, where the plastic comes from and the level of contamination.

    "There are lots of issues that are still big question marks."

    https://news.sky.com/story/amp/plastic-bottles-and-bags-recycled-to-build-roads-11101612
     
  6. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    Please do. We don't need dumb fucks who can't read in this serious topic of discussion.
     
  7. KBE6EKCTAH_CCP

    KBE6EKCTAH_CCP Arrow sash belt with Lederhosen

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    Well I actually provided my opinion instead of spamming articles every second post.

    You should try existing.
     
  8. regmma123

    regmma123 Brown Belt

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    Lol at everyone blaming China

    typical
     
  9. cincymma79

    cincymma79 Red Belt

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    How is India absent? Can’t be
     
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  10. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    They're driving on theirs.

    Building roads from plastic waste in India

    The Indian government announced in October an investment of $11 Billion to build 83,677km of roads over the next five years
    November 12, 2017

    [​IMG]
    A chemistry professor in India has found an innovative way of dealing with plastic pollution, by turning them into roads, which are tougher than regular asphalt roads.


    Dubai - Have you heard of plastic roads? Or do you know only pre-millennial, 20th-century road technology.


    A new road building technique for the 21st century is advancing fast in India today.

    More than 33,796 km of roads in India are plastic roads, according to a World Economic Forum report. A new report, however, states that the actual length of Indian roads using the innovative, home-grown technique runs for more than 100,000km as of October.

    Using recycled plastic to build roads not only curbs pollution but also creates jobs, said experts. And there's more to it.

    India's plastic roads made from recycled materials are not only greener, but are also stronger and maintenance-free — they could last about three times as long as conventional road structures, according to new research.

    Under the government's massive plastic recycling programme, waste pickers collect plastic litter which are shredded in machines subsidised by the Indian government.

    Then they sell it to road builders.

    According to a World Economic Forum (WEF) report, plastic can make roads more durable against extreme weather — floods and extreme heat.

    The Indian plastic roads solution is apart from a European road building technology using recycled plastic.

    VolkerWessels, a construction services firm headquartered in Hollad, also wants to roll out plastic roads. Their idea involves recycling plastic waste into lightweight, prefabricated modules with hollow interiors that can be fitted with cables and plastic pipes and allow excess water to drain.

    Because the pre-fabricated units will be easy to transport, assemble and maintain, and the lighter weight, it also means the ground will be less prone to subsidence. The firm believes that dues to it light weight and modular installation, the roads could be built to last three times longer.

    Anne Koudstaal and Simon Jorritsma, inventors of PlasticRoad, said they expect to have a first prototype completed by year-end 2017.

    How it works

    Plastic waste — mostly water or soda bottles — are first sorted. After sorting, the material is cleaned, dried, and shredded.

    The shredded plastic is mixed and melted at around 170°C. Hot bitumen is then added and mixed with the melted plastic.

    After mixing the mixture is laid as one would with regular asphalt concrete.

    [​IMG]
    Latest reports show that India has already built more than 100,000km of roads using plastic waste, which are proven to be tougher than traditional asphalt roads.


    Now, Indian's home-grown and affordable road technology that salvages plastic waste could be used in a massive road rebuilding underway, analysts said.

    India has the world’s second-largest road network — but also one of the highest numbers of road accidents globally. Official data recorded more than 150,000 deaths from about 500,000 accidents last year.

    Nearly a tenth of those deaths were caused by accidents involving potholes, which are a common feature of Indian roads.

    In October, the Indian government announced an investment of 6.9 trillion rupees ($11 billion) to build 83,677km of roads over the next five years.

    Home-grown, tested technology

    Now, calls are growing for public works authorities to build roads with a tested technology using plastic waste, which reduces costs and makes roads more durable and thus safer.

    [​IMG]
    The Kolkata Metropolitan Development Authority (KMDA) is putting plastic waste to good use — by crushing and mixing with with asphalt to pave roads.


    “Plastic roads will not only withstand future monsoon damage but will also solve the problem of disposing of non-recyclable plastic,” said Isher Judge Ahluwalia, former head of a government committee on urban infrastructure.

    Each kilometre of a single-lane tar road can consume one tonne of plastic waste, and the plastic can double or even triple the life of the road, said the economist in a paper published in October with Almitra Patel, a solid waste management expert.

    India produces about 15,000 tonnes of plastic waste daily, of which about 9,000 tonnes is recycled.

    The remainder clutters landfills and clogs drains, and is blamed for urban flooding.

    Chemistry

    A technology developed by Rajagopalan Vasudevan, a chemistry professor at Thiagarajar College of Engineering in the southern city of Madurai, uses finely-shredded plastic waste that is added to heated bitumen.

    This mix is poured over stones.

    The plastic waste can include anything from sweet wrappers to shopping bags. The mix cuts the quantity of bitumen required by 10 per cent, Vasudevan said.

    He developed the technology in 2002 and first built a plastic road in his college before approaching state officials.

    “We spend so much on building roads that develop potholes and need rebuilding in no time,” Vasudevan told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

    “The road I built is still intact — there are no potholes, no cracks. That is proof of its strength and durability, plus it uses waste plastic that otherwise litters streets and rivers.”

    At least 11 states, including Vasudevan’s home state of Tamil Nadu, have used the technology to build more than 100,000km of roads, he said.

    One student took the technology back to Bhutan.

    Mandatory

    In 2015, the Indian government made it mandatory to use waste plastic in building most highways.

    But some states have been slow to embrace the technology, citing difficulties in segregating the plastic and bringing contractors on board.

    The new infrastructure commitment gives fresh impetus, Vasudevan said.

    “We are going to be generating waste plastic, and we are going to be building roads for the foreseeable future,” he said.

    “Why not use the method that does away with plastic waste and makes the roads cheaper, durable and safer?”

    https://m.gulfnews.com/amp/news/asi...g-roads-from-plastic-waste-in-india-1.2122745
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2018
  11. cincymma79

    cincymma79 Red Belt

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    Well fuck me

    Interesting
     
  12. Bald1

    Bald1 War Room Can

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    Planned obsolescence is profitable, especially when it's used as a selling point of the product and is a built in feature.

    It's so cheap you can afford to throw it away. Over and over and over again....
     
  13. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    My fellow Californians should start familiarize themselves with eco-friendly paper straws now :)

     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
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  14. InternetHero

    InternetHero Titanium Belt

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    Hong Kong seasides are now usually choked with plastics, cardboard, and all kinds of junk.

    The source of the garbage remains a mystery... a mystery that is about 50 km away to the north.
     
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  15. Scheme

    Scheme Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card Yellow Card

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    Fuck alternatives to straws. Why do you even need a straw in the first place? I can't think of many use cases for straws where they are actually necessary. Garbage product for terrible people.

    Big straw companies have created sheeple that will literally buy anything. I think their shape also turns people into homosexuals.
     
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  16. WTF2008

    WTF2008 Brown Belt

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    Really? This just came up. Wasn't an issue last year or the year before?
     
  17. InternetHero

    InternetHero Titanium Belt

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    Oh relax, no need to martyr yourself over a redundant plastic suction receptacle.
     
  18. InternetHero

    InternetHero Titanium Belt

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    I agree with you that plastic toys in fast food is stupid.

    However, regulating these kind of things, and not letting people make some stupid choices, invites a lot of potential bureaucratic bosses, bullies, and others who make other kinds of usually stupid choices for all of our lives.

    Inviting oppression, hypocrisy, and corruption, depending on the culture.

    There is a choice about how much we let people be stupid, or how many stupid bosses try to stop stupidity with stupid ideas.
     
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  19. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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  20. TheLastSpartan

    TheLastSpartan Blue Belt

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    Its insane just how damaging humans are to the environment. Literally a planetary plague.
     

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